Three_Men_in_a_Boat

Want to read about travel, without blowing a hole in your wallet? Well, you can do so by just heading to Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/) and downloading some of these classic titles that are now available free of cost.

[This article was published in the August 15, 2013 edition of the Kunzum Magazine. Click here to download the same for free. And subscribe to the magazine so you don't miss any issue. Links to previous issues also available here.]

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome
Seldom can any trip have been described as hilariously as this boat trip between Kingston and Oxford. Be it the adventures of the four travellers, the descriptions of those they met, and well, even the attempt to open a can of jam, there is plenty to make you laugh here! Although fictional, easily the most entertaining travel book ever.

 

The-Worst-Journey-in-the-World

The Worst Journey in the World by Apsley Cherry-Garrard
This book details the 1910-13 British Antarctic expedition that claimed the lives of Robert Scott and three of his colleagues. Wrap yourself up well when you read it, for, no matter what the temperature is, you will feel a chill around you as Cherry-Garrard describes Antarctica, its beauty and its dangers.


aroundtheworld

Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne
Verne’s classic is a work of fiction, but it captures the thrill of travel like few travel books do. It all begins with Englishman Phileas Fogg taking a bet to circumnavigate the globe in eighty days – a tough ask in the nineteenth century. Things are not helped by the forces of nature, an eccentric valet and a suspicious detective.

TravelsWithDonkey

Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes by Robert Louis Stevenson
Best known for classics like Kidnapped and Treasure Island, Stevenson is also believed to have paved the way for modern travel writing this account of  a 12 day hiking trip in Southern France. Yes, he did take a donkey along.

 

Life-on-the-Mississippi

Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain
Before he became a celebrated author, Mark Twain was a steamboat pilot. Life on the Mississippi details his training for the job as well as a trip from St Louis to New Orleans. It is considered a travel classic and has also inspired its share of films and other books.

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